Non-Exempt Employees Traveling for Work: How to Manage the Time Clock

Douglas, Jeff - 300dpi
Jeffrey Douglas

There may be instances where non-exempt employees are required to travel for business.  This is a common practice in the fashion industry where regular trips to factories throughout the world are a regular part of the business.  Non-exempt employees traveling for business can create serious wage and hour implications that, if not addressed properly, can lead to unaccounted for compensable time and overtime liability.  Continue reading

AB 5, Codifying Dynamex and Broadening the ABC Test’s Application, Passes California Legislature

Executive Summary: After months of debate and negotiations, the California State Legislature passed the controversial AB 5 on Wednesday, September 11, 2019, bringing it one step closer to being law. If passed, the new law is expected to impact and clarify the use of independent contractors throughout the state. It is now on Governor Newsom’s desk. If signed, it will go into effect on January 1, 2020. Continue reading

Employers Should be Prepared for the Challenges of the 2019 Hurricane Season

Executive Summary: As Hurricane Dorian, the first hurricane of the 2019 Atlantic season, bears down on Florida, the approaching storm serves as a reminder that employers should be prepared to address storm-related issues if they are required to close their businesses and as they prepare to resume normal operations. For example, employers need to determine whether closing the office means having to pay workers who stay home, being on the hook for unemployment compensation, and whether workers’ compensation applies to weather-related injuries. Continue reading

New Jersey Passes the Broadest Wage Theft Law in Country With Dire Consequences for Employers

Introduction: On the heels of the broadest Pay Equity law in the country, New Jersey has just passed the broadest wage theft law in the country, which is certain to lead to increased litigation. Unwary employers may not only be facing insurmountable fines and penalties, but potentially jail time for even minor violations of the new law. The new law establishes treble damages and criminal penalties for non-payment of wages to New Jersey employees. More importantly, there is a presumption of retaliation for any adverse employment action that occurs for months after an employee complains about their wages. The presumption is rebuttable, but only if the employer produces clear and convincing evidence. The law further extends the statute of limitations to six years and allows for reinstatement of employees. Continue reading

Non-Kosher Provisions in FLSA Settlements in the Second Circuit

Shooman, Jeff - 300dpi
Jeffrey Shooman

I came across a short court order a few days ago that admonished settling parties in an FLSA suit for including an impermissible provision in the settlement.  Vasquez v. T&W Rest., Inc., 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 121129 (S.D.N.Y. July 19, 2019).  In the opinion, Magistrate Judge Pitman reminded the parties that “provision[s] prohibiting the re-employment of plaintiff . . . are not permissible in an FLSA settlement.”  Continue reading

Chicago Passes Ordinance Requiring Employers to Provide Predictive Scheduling for Certain Industries

In the most expansive predictive scheduling law in the country to date, Chicago City officials passed the “Fair Workweek Ordinance” on July 24, 2019, and Mayor Lori Lightfoot has indicated she would quickly sign the Ordinance. The Ordinance provides extensive protection for certain employees with regard to advance scheduling of work. Although employers have some time to get used to the idea, by July 1, 2020, they will need to have a firm plan in place to address this new Ordinance. Continue reading