Supershuttle Transports Independent Contractor Status into the Spotlight

 

Harkavy, Michelle - 300dpi
Michelle Harkavy

Executive Summary: On January 25, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) affirmed the Acting Regional Director’s determination that franchisees who drive for SuperShuttle are independent contractors, not statutory employees, and therefore are unable to organize or join a union. See SuperShuttle DFW, Inc., and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1338(Case 16-RC-010963). In reaching this decision, the Board shifted the analysis back to the common-law agency test it has long used for determining when a worker will be considered an independent contractor rather than an employee for purposes of coverage under the National Labor Relations Act (NRLA). The Board’s decision in SuperShuttle emphasizes the role of entrepreneurial opportunity and rejects the overemphasis placed on “right to control” by its 2014 decision in FedEx Home Delivery, 361 NLRB 610 (2014). Continue reading

Michigan Legislature Alters the Minimum Wage

Ferrier, Valerie - 300dpi
Valerie Ferrier

In the past few years, in order to keep pace with their relative costs of living, states and localities across the country have increased their minimum wage in excess of the federal rate, which has remained unchanged at $7.25 per hour for the past decade. Last year, the One Fair Wage campaign, which promotes an increase in the minimum wage, particularly for restaurant workers who depend on tips for most of their income, supported a citizen-driven ballot measure that would have increased Michigan’s minimum wage to $12 per hour by 2022. The state’s minimum wage, as of 2018, was $9.25 per hour. Continue reading

The Writing is on the Wall: A $15 Minimum Wage Edges Toward the New Normal

Ferrier, Valerie - 300dpi
Valerie Ferrier

Executive Summary: As Democrats take over the House of Representatives this month, some will be pushing to increase the federal minimum wage, which has remained stagnant at $7.25 per hour for the past decade. Not content to wait for Congress, the “Fight for 15” movement has scored victories throughout the country by increasing wages locally. Many states and localities will be or have already begun raising the minimum wage incrementally until they reach $15. Against this shifting backdrop, employers with operations in multiple cities need to be aware of different minimum wage rates that may be applicable in certain localities, even if such rates differ from those in the rest of the state.

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