Renewed Increases to the White Collar Salary Threshold on the Horizon

Gray, Kristin - 300dpi
Kristin Gray

In 2016, as employers scrambled to prepare to comply with the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) “final rule,” which more than doubled the minimum salary threshold needed to meet the “white collar” exemptions by, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit issued an injunction blocking it.  Now, the DOL is expected to issue a new Notice of Proposed Rulemaking—possibly this month—increasing the salary threshold for these exemptions.  Continue reading

U.S. Department of Labor’s New Guidance, Compliance Tool, and Leadership

Adams, Julie 300dpi
Julie Adams

February has been a busy month for the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”).  The Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) published new guidance addressing tipped employees and payment of subminimum wages and released a new compliance tool.  The DOL also named a new Acting Wage and Hour Administrator.  Employers should review these new publications and developments for applicability to their workforce: Continue reading

After the Scare: Sixth Circuit says Insurance Agents Are Still Independent Contractors

Close, Grant - 300dpi
Grant Close

Last week, many insurance carriers breathed a sigh of relief when the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals held that more than 700 American Family Life Insurance agents were properly classified as independent contractors, not employees.  The case is Jammal v. American Family Life Insurance Company, 2019 U.S. App. LEXIS 2905.  Continue reading

The Writing is on the Wall: A $15 Minimum Wage Edges Toward the New Normal

Ferrier, Valerie - 300dpi
Valerie Ferrier

Executive Summary: As Democrats take over the House of Representatives this month, some will be pushing to increase the federal minimum wage, which has remained stagnant at $7.25 per hour for the past decade. Not content to wait for Congress, the “Fight for 15” movement has scored victories throughout the country by increasing wages locally. Many states and localities will be or have already begun raising the minimum wage incrementally until they reach $15. Against this shifting backdrop, employers with operations in multiple cities need to be aware of different minimum wage rates that may be applicable in certain localities, even if such rates differ from those in the rest of the state.

Continue reading

DOL Currently Surveying Wages Paid to Construction Workers in North Carolina

Gray, Kristin - 300dpi
Kristin Gray

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“DOL”) is currently conducting a survey seeking information from employers on wages paid to construction workers in 46 metropolitan North Carolina counties on all active building projects.  The DOL is seeking this information to establish prevailing wage rates required under the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts (“DBRA”). Continue reading

Out With The Old; In With The Original: DOL Re-issues 2009 Tip Credit Guidance

Briit, Louis - 300dpi
Louis Britt

On November 8, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) re-issued an opinion letter abandoning the “80/20 Rule,” which prohibited employers from taking a tip credit if a tipped employee spent more than 20% of his or her working time on non-tipped work.

The opinion letter is a re-issuance of one previously published on January 16, 2009 by the Bush administration.  The letter, however, was withdrawn once President Obama took office. The DOL’s new guidance provides restaurant and hospitality employers with clarity and a more practical approach defining when a tip credit can be taken. Continue reading