San Antonio Approves New Paid Sick Leave Ordinance Effective December 1, 2019

Executive Summary: As we have mentioned in our previous Legal Alert, the effective date of San Antonio’s paid sick leave ordinance was delayed until December 1, 2019, by agreement after a lawsuit was filed against the city. At the time, the city indicated that one of the reasons for this agreed delay was so that the city could revise the ordinance. Continue reading

U.S. District Court Rules in Favor of Airline Flight Crew Employees on Paid Sick Leave Challenge

Executive Summary: On October 11, 2019, a federal judge for the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington ruled that Washington state’s paid sick leave law does not violate the Constitution or federal preemption law, thereby guaranteeing sick leave benefits for airline flight crew employees based in Washington. Continue reading

San Antonio Postpones Its Paid Sick Leave Ordinance and Legal Challenge to Dallas’ Ordinance Imminent

In response to the lawsuit filed against the City of San Antonio regarding its paid sick leave ordinance, the City of San Antonio has agreed to postpone implementation of the ordinance until December 1, 2019. A Bexar County judge signed the agreed order on July 24, 2019. Accordingly, employers with San Antonio employees have been given a few months before they must enact paid sick leave policies for San Antonio employees (subject to any decision by the Texas Supreme Court on this issue). Continue reading

How Many Benefits are Included in the Calculation of Regular Rate? The World May Never Know

Briit, Louis - 300dpi
Louis Britt

On March 28, 2019, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a lengthy and detailed Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) to revise the regulations governing how employers should calculate “regular rate” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). Upon release, the DOL set a deadline for public notice and comment of May 28, 2019. However, citing the interest expressed by “law firms, unions, and advocacy organizations,” the DOL extended the period for public comment to June 12, 2019. Continue reading